How did Bee Gees get their name?

In 1955, the brothers Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb moved back to their father's hometown of Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester, England, and formed a skiffle/rock-and-roll group, The Rattlesnakes, which consisted of Barry on guitar and vocals, Robin and Maurice on vocals, and friends Paul Frost on drums and Kenny Horrocks on tea-chest bass.

In May 1958, The Rattlesnakes were disbanded when Frost and Horrocks left, so the Gibb brothers then formed Wee Johnny Hayes and the Blue Cats, with Barry as Johnny Hayes.

In1958, the young brothers began performing and were introduced to leading Brisbane radio DJ Bill Gates by speedway promoter and driver Bill Goode, who had hired the brothers to entertain the crowd at the Redcliffe Speedway in 1960. The crowd at the speedway would throw money onto the track for the boys, who generally performed during the interval of meetings (usually on the back of a truck that drove around the track). Gates renamed them the BG's after his (Goode's) and Barry Gibb's initials—thus the name was not specifically a reference to "Brothers Gibb", despite popular belief.

For his songwriting, Barry sparked the interest of Australian star Col Joye, who helped them get a record deal in 1963 with Festival Records subsidiary Leedon Records, under the name "Bee Gees".