How did Elvis Costello get his name?

Elvis Costello was born Declan Patrick MacManus. His full given name is sometimes inaccurately listed as Declan Patrick Aloysius MacManus but Aloysius was not one of his names at birth. Costello began using the name "Declan Patrick Aloysius MacManus" (or sometimes, "D.P.A. MacManus") in both the writing and production credits of his albums in 1986. It has been suggested that Aloysius could be his confirmation name, or that the use of the name Aloysius is a reference to English comedian Tony Hancock, born Anthony John Hancock, who became famous in the UK playing a comic character who went by the name Anthony Aloysius St. John Hancock.

He began his career as part of London's pub rock scene in the early 1970s and later became associated with the first wave of the British punk and new wave movement that emerged in the mid-to-late 1970s. His critically acclaimed debut album, My Aim Is True, was released in 1977. Shortly after recording it, he formed the Attractions as his backing band in 1971. There, he formed his first band, a folk duo called Rusty, with Allan Mayes. After completing secondary school at St. Francis Xavier's College he moved back to London where he next formed a band called Flip City and were active from 1974 through to early 1976. Around this time, Costello adopted the stage name D.P. Costello. His father had performed under the name Day Costello, and Elvis has said in interviews that he took this name as a tribute to his father.

He continued to write songs and began looking for a solo recording contract. He was signed to independent label Stiff Records on the basis of a demo tape. His manager at Stiff, Jake Riviera, suggested a name change, combining Elvis Presley's first name and Costello, his father's stage name.